Hip Surgery

Surgery & Surgery Alternatives

Surgical Hip Procedures

Hip surgery may be the best option for your hip injury, but there are surgery alternatives as well.  We offer the latest in medical advancement to ensure that we find the best treatment for your injury or condition.  Review hip surgery and surgery alternative options, success rates, recovery times, and more below.

Total Hip Replacement (Anterior Approach) Surgery

This is a new surgical procedure where the damaged cartilage and bone of the hip joint (ball and socket) is surgically replaced with artificial materials. In order to preserve tissue, in some cases this approach is used as an alternative to traditional hip replacement surgery.

Advantages of Anterior Approach Total Hip Replacement Surgery

  • This approach generally allows for a faster recovery time
  • Improved mobility
  • Less pain, because muscle tissue is not affected during the procedure (in traditional hip replacement surgery, muscles can be damaged).
  • Can prevent dislocations
  • The incision is at the front of the body- you won’t sit on the sometimes-painful wound site.
  • Patients can freely bend at the hip and bear full weight immediately or soon after surgery
  • Reduced scarring
  • Stability of the implant soon after surgery
  • Larger, heavier patients may be suitable for minimally invasive hip surgery with this technique

Hip Arthroscopy

Arthroscopy is a procedure that allows surgeons to view inside a hip joint without needing a large cut or large instruments.  This procedure is minimally invasive and used to diagnose and treat many hip conditions.

Painful conditions affecting the labrum, articular cartilage, or other tissues in the joint (resulting from injury or disorder) usually benefit from surgical intervention.

Some conditions include:

  • Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) where extra bone (spurs) develops and damages the soft tissues of the hip during movement.
  • Synovitis where the tissues that surround the joint become inflamed.
  • Snapping hip syndrome where a tendon rubs across the outside of the joint and can become damaged from repeated rubbing.
  • Loose bodies fragments of bone or cartilage that become loose and move around within the joint.
  • Chondromalacia (early arthritis)
  • Labral tears
  • Hip bursitis

 

Surgical Procedure

A small puncture is made in the hip and the arthroscope is inserted. Images are projected onto a video screen and the surgeon can view any abnormalities. Once the problem is identified, the surgeon will use tiny instruments depending on the treatment required. Some common procedures include:

  • smoothing or repairing torn cartilage
  • trimming bone spurs
  • removing inflamed tissue

Arthroscopic Labral Repair

A hip arthroscopy for a labral tear will be recommended if the injury has not responded to non-surgical treatments such as rest and anti-inflammatory medications.

A small puncture is made in the hip and the arthroscope is inserted. Images are projected onto a video screen and the surgeon can view any abnormalities. Once the problem is identified, the surgeon will use small instruments to perform the required procedure. Surgeon will use sutures to repair the tear in the labrum.

Arthroscopic Hip Trochanteric Bursectomy

A hip arthroscopy for trochanteric bursitis will be recommended if the injury has not responded to non-surgical treatments, such as rest and anti-inflammatory medications.

A small puncture is made in the hip and the arthroscope is inserted. Images are projected onto a video screen allowing the surgeon to view any abnormalities. Once the problem is identified, the surgeon will use small instruments to perform the procedure.

The surgeon will carefully remove the inflamed bursa (a bursectomy), and at the same time will perform an iliotibial band (ITB) release.  The purpose of the release is to decompress the inflamed area, allowing the region to heal successfully after surgery.

Non-Surgical Hip Procedures

Many surgery alternatives are available for those whose injuries and conditions can still be treated without requiring surgical intervention. Please explore these options below and contact our office to book your appointment and discuss your situation.

What is Mesenchymal Stem Cell (MSC) Therapy?

Your body consists of billions of cells that degenerate and regenerate in a daily cycle. As older cells die off, new cells are created from the stem cells.  The cells form organs of the body such as skin, muscles, ligaments, joints, bone, tendons, and the brain.  Unfortunately, if tissue gets damaged, the degenerative process dominates the cycle and the organs will become less functional, and pain will often result.  The stem cells used for MSC are found in your own bone marrow, and are known as mesenchymal cells.

Which Conditions Benefit from MSC Therapy?

Degenerative conditions such as osteoarthritis and joint injuries respond well to MSC Therapy.  Contact our office to find out whether you are a candidate for this advanced procedure

How Does it Work?

  • Stem cells are obtained from the patient’s body, generally from within the bone marrow in the hip area.
  • The procedure takes place in our clinic, under ultrasound or x-ray guidance.
  • You will lie face down and the doctor will thoroughly clean the area. Next, a needle penetrates the bone and will remove blood from within the marrow, which contains the stem cells.
  • After the procedure, the stem cell rich blood is taken to the laboratory where it is concentrated, cells that are not required are removed, and the remaining stem cells purified.
  • The stem cells are injected precisely by hand into the injured tissues in other areas of the body using MSK Ultrasound for guidance. Through the imaging devices, your doctor can ensure the cells are injected precisely at the site of need.
  • Concentrated platelets are generally collected at the same time, as they help to activate the stem cells once they have been injected.
  • Once the stem cells are injected, they will enhance the natural repair process of degenerated and injured tendons, ligaments, and arthritic joints

For more information on this procedure, or to find out whether you would be a suitable candidate, feel free to contact our office.

Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) Treatment

Platelet-Rich Plasma Treatment, also known as PRP, is a popular treatment method for a variety of knee problems. It is often used by athletes due to its lack of negative side effects and the fact that little recovery time needed after the procedure.

What is Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP)

Though our blood seems to be all liquid (which is called plasma), it contains very small solid parts such as red cells, white cells, and platelets.  Platelets play an important role in helping blood to clot, and platelets also contain growth factors that help the body heal itself.

How Does PRP Work?

First, blood is removed from the patient. Platelets are separated and removed from the other blood components through a process known as centrifugation. The increased concentration of growth factors in PRP speed up the body’s healing process. PRP is gently injected into the site of the injury. PRP can also be used to aid in healing after surgery for some injuries.

What Conditions Benefit from PRP?
A number of conditions may benefit from treatment by PRP, but it’s important to visit our office to determine whether your unique condition will be suitable for this treatment. Some common problems that have had successful PRP outcomes include:

Dr. Sima has experience treating virtually all orthopaedic conditions. Contact us if you have questions or don't see a procedure listed here.

Dear Dr. Sima,
I am writing to express my appreciation to you for providing the surgical skills needed for my recent hip replacement surgery. I am grateful for the commitment you’ve made to continually learn and use innovative techniques which benefit your patient’s successful surgery and recovery.

-Rick Runnels